Blog Archives

Thoughts on Doug Belshaw’s OpenBadges videos

This is another win for my PLN. I am reviewing Doug Belshaw’s well-presented videos about OpenBadges.

Doug, as many of you know, works for Mozilla, and is one of the leading minds there on the OpenBadges initiative. Rather than performing endless F2F briefs, he created a couple of videos that outline the basics.  I want to record a few thoughts and queries as I review them. Read the rest of this entry

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More MOOC-ing!

In spite of my mixed feelings about the Stanford DNLE MOOC, I am taking on another MOOC in the form of the Open University’s Open Learning Design Studio and their MOOC: “Learning Design for a 21st Century Curriculum“.

I am going to be adding some different tags and categories to try and keep things all straight, but I’m interested to see what lessons I can glean from what is – largely – a course designed for Higher Education.  While I do have Higher Ed affiliations, I get the sense that this “21st Century Curriculum” is broad enough to allow for applications across a variety of sectors. I’m also interested to make more connections with other L&D folks and gain from their experiences.

Stay tuned!

Dear CSTD…why you should stop talking about Learning Styles

While this response is directed to the good folks at CSTD, I leave it as a public artifact for those interested in the whole Learning Styles thing.

There was a time when I admit that I subscribed to the concept of Learning Styles. I also understand why there’s an instinctive sense-making and buy-in when people look at it. Whether you subscribe to Kolb (1984) or to the VAK theory, we generally accept that people tend to learn in different ways.

Yes.

But… Read the rest of this entry

Stanford MOOC Assignments and Disconnects

I had a chance exchange via Twitter with someone I have followed for a while, Joyce Seitzinger. She’s well-respected in Moodle circles, and is also an active participant in DNLE and regularly contributes through the Twitter #DNLE hashtag.

She was expressing some frustration with the nature of assignments and their (relative) lack of instructional/learning design.  I have to say, I agree with her.  Read the rest of this entry

An Inspiring Podcast from an Unusual Source

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Visit 99percentinvisible.org for more information.

I’m distracting myself from a little “student remorse” from my hack job on (Stanford MOOC) DNLE Assignment 4 by sharing a recent find.

While I’m a latecomer to the whole podcast thing, I am making up for lost time and I try to balance out my entertainment (e.g. serialized podcast dramas) with some educational listenings.

This morning I listened to the initial episodes of “99% Invisible“, a podcast out of San Francisco that describes itself as:

A tiny radio show about design, architecture & the 99% invisible activity that shapes our world

I like the concept for a couple of reasons. First, it speaks about design; a fundamental discipline that transcends physical and virtual boundaries. After all, you can have great ideas, but without a solid design to make them happen, they will remain ideas only.

Second, the format. This podcast is a positioned as a radio segment with a very limited time allotment. Therefore, the host and producer have a small window in which to get across their idea or subject.

Finally, it also speaks about the things we don’t normally pay attention to and the thinking behind them.

This podcast has relevance to what we do as educators. First, we have to be aware of the little things, and all of the prep work that goes into a learning solution (e.g. good analysis). Second, solutions don’t have to be big to be effective and meaningful. Finally, design, design, design. Design it, refine it, try it out, refine some more, and let the design evolve. Just because you start with one particular vision doesn’t mean it can’t adapt as you learn more about what recipients “need” instead of what you think they “want”.

Enjoy your Monday!

Storify – My Test Drive

While I grabbed a Storify account some time back, I hadn’t really done much more than explore it at a fairly basic level. However, I finally took the plunge and decided to take a new approach to summarizing one of my favourite PLN discussions, #chat2lrn.

In concept, the Storify concept is simple: search for whatever you want, and turn it into a “story” of related events, news items, media clips, whatever.   Add in your own commentary, reassemble at will, and you can create your very own amalgamated/aggregated digital artifact.

This was a good learning experience for me because I wanted to find a way to catch up on the tweets and draw some of my own conclusions, particularly because I wasn’t able to stay for the whole chat. Read the rest of this entry

My first (deliberate) Sketchnotes – from “Gamification in Education”

Welcome to the new Hitch Hiker’s Guide!!

Greetings, welcome, and – hopefully – welcome back!

After some deep consideration, I decided on a small exercise in re-branding. While my ‘elearningguy’ handle represented a lot of what I was doing when I created it, it’s not reflective of all my activities, nor is it completely indicative of who I am as a Learning & Development professional.

I will leave the other site available as a redirect page for a while and allow direct followers to change/update bookmarks.

Thanks for following me as I take the next leg of the journey.

Rapid ID and Rapid Dev? Yes! But…

Thanks (yet again) to Twitter, I came across a post by Karen from Langevin Learning Services (@karencar_ID) who shared an offering from the folks at Bottom Line Performance in Indianapolis (@BLPIndy). The substance of this post was whether or not Rapid Design and Rapid Development were possible. BLP’s inspiration was another entry from the widely read Rapid e-Learning Blog.

My immediate reaction was, “Yes, but, there are some caveats.”

Read the rest of this entry

Hell hath no fury like Intellectual Property unattributed

I’ve been witness to an interesting couple of hours on Twitter.

A L&D consultancy network (who shall remain @Gilfuseducation) has an extensive “industry news” section. There’s just one problem with it: much of the content has been scraped from other sources. Here’s one example from Alan Levine’s cogdogblog. Read the rest of this entry