Category Archives: Social Learning

A shout-out to Working out Loud!

Lots of changes and lots of updates, but the short version is that I’ve moved on from my engagement with the RCAF and I’m now working very close to home for a really great people services firm, Northern Lights Canada.

My big win this week was getting the OK from the CEO to engage in some #workoutloud and #showyourwork activities, so I can actively share some of the work I have going on. Leading and stewarding the transformation of Learning & Development is my major focus right now so I’m genuinely excited to shed some light on this work.

Watch this space for updates and examples of what’s going on behind the scenes on the first project: revamping the onboarding program for new hires.

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P2Pu Badge Project 1 (proposed)

Preamble

I am using this post as the basis for my proposed Badge project for P2PU. I’m keeping it relatively high level and I want to include the issuer, receiver and other possible roles. Any and all commentary is welcomed and actively solicited.

DISCLAIMER: This proposal is neither endorsed nor sponsored by the team of L&D professionals who run the twitter chat discussed herein. It is being used as a vehicle for a possible badging framework across similar professional development chats. Read the rest of this entry

Hell hath no fury like Intellectual Property unattributed

I’ve been witness to an interesting couple of hours on Twitter.

A L&D consultancy network (who shall remain @Gilfuseducation) has an extensive “industry news” section. There’s just one problem with it: much of the content has been scraped from other sources. Here’s one example from Alan Levine’s cogdogblog. Read the rest of this entry

Pinterest: It took a while, but I get it. Finally.

Pinterest LogoIn many respects (for those who subscribe to such things), I am a typical Taurus, and stubborn as hell. I admit that there are times when I will resist trying new things until I know I can see the benefits for me. Once I “get it”, however, I’m unstoppable.

That paragraph accurately sums up my experience with Twitter. While initially skeptical, I have now – as most of you know – embraced the tool enthusiastically because I see the value from a personal and professional point of view. A secondary benefit is, of course, the entertainment value.

And then came Pinterest…

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Simplifying Learning – From Jane Hart

This Mind map is from Jane’s June 4 chat about simplifying learning. Very interesting to explore and look at the things I’m already aware of as well as the ones that I need to take a much closer look at.

Sadly, I can’t get the map to embed properly, so the link will have to suffice.

My experience with Snapguide: Thoughts, implications, and a wishlist

It was one of those “Just in Time” moments for learning. I had been sharing some photos of a trip into Toronto through Instagr.am and cross-posting them to Facebook. A grad school classmate asked me how I achieved the effects. After listing the tools I used, she jokingly asked when I’d have the e-learning course ready for her to teach her how to do it all. Undaunted, I figured this was a good opportunity to try out Snapguide. Read the rest of this entry

To blog, or not to blog, that isn’t the question

Today had one of those unexpected, but wholly valuable exchanges. In a retweet from Jennifer Dalby (@injenuity) about blogging by Clive Elsmore (@clivesir) and subsequent comments from Dave Truss (@datruss) we wound up in a lengthy exchange about blogging, who the audience is, and how to write “just for you”

Suffice it to say it was a small kick in the hind parts and I resolve to be more diligent about keeping the dust bunnies away from this place. I’ll be making some time over this long weekend to write more about this particular exchange, so this post serves as a little reminder and a thank you to Clive, Jennifer, and Dave for adding a little inspiration and remotivation to my afternoon.

CSTD Day 1 Workshop – Harold Jarche

(Harold Jarche is Chairman of the Internet Time Alliance)

The focus of Harold’s session is on Social Learning and what this concept means to the world of Learning & Development. I’ve already had the opportunity to attend one of his PKM workshops, and I’m already a bit of a practitioner, but he’s always worth seeing. Having said that, Harold’s approach is somewhat eclectic and draws from a variety of disciplines and sources. If you don’t pay attention to what’s going on it might be easy to lose the thread of the discussion. That’s not a criticism, per se, just an observation.
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