Category Archives: learning

Myths and Facts about Brain Training

Credit to Juan Domingo Farnos for sharing this link via Scoop.It.

While I get the general concepts of brain plasticity, the research jury is basically “out” on the long term benefits of brain training. At best, the results are inconclusive if viewed objectively. Much of the research is considered biased (e.g. Conducted by the vendors offering such products/services) and may not stand up to scientific scrutiny.

This infographic will share a little insight into the claims compared with the facts.

The Truth About Brain Training Infographic
Find more education infographics on e-Learning Infographics

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A shout-out to Working out Loud!

Lots of changes and lots of updates, but the short version is that I’ve moved on from my engagement with the RCAF and I’m now working very close to home for a really great people services firm, Northern Lights Canada.

My big win this week was getting the OK from the CEO to engage in some #workoutloud and #showyourwork activities, so I can actively share some of the work I have going on. Leading and stewarding the transformation of Learning & Development is my major focus right now so I’m genuinely excited to shed some light on this work.

Watch this space for updates and examples of what’s going on behind the scenes on the first project: revamping the onboarding program for new hires.

Leaving ADDIE for SAM. With a Crossbow?

I got a chuckle out of the reaction from some of my valued PLN members when I shared a photo of a (nerf) Crossbow training aid from today’s “Leaving ADDIE for SAM” workshop. *

I was laughing at myself because, in hindsight, I probably should have added a little context to the image. Read the rest of this entry

More MOOC-ing!

In spite of my mixed feelings about the Stanford DNLE MOOC, I am taking on another MOOC in the form of the Open University’s Open Learning Design Studio and their MOOC: “Learning Design for a 21st Century Curriculum“.

I am going to be adding some different tags and categories to try and keep things all straight, but I’m interested to see what lessons I can glean from what is – largely – a course designed for Higher Education.  While I do have Higher Ed affiliations, I get the sense that this “21st Century Curriculum” is broad enough to allow for applications across a variety of sectors. I’m also interested to make more connections with other L&D folks and gain from their experiences.

Stay tuned!

Badges! Badges? Yes, we need some stinkin’ Badges!

In typical “me” fashion, I balance out my early adoption and exploration with a relatively late-to-the-table professional development activity: Badges.

I get the basic concept, but a well-timed email from the folks at my upcoming OLDS MOOC got me thinking a little more seriously about learning more about the process. In relatively short order I found myself reading about the Mozilla Open Badges Initiative, and then earning my first badges!

Well, once I get my teeth into something, I’m keen to keep going. I am now signed up in the P2PU Open Badges 101 self-directed “course” to provide me with a little practical experience in the area of badges and related info. I’m definitely intrigued by the possibilities, even if its not something that I can apply at CFSATE, I like the potential for future opportunities. I also see some very interesting ideas at the corporate level, too…

My next task is to do some mapping out of what a badge program would look like, even at a conceptual level, so I can submit it to P2PU for their consideration.

Wish me luck!

Dear CSTD…why you should stop talking about Learning Styles

While this response is directed to the good folks at CSTD, I leave it as a public artifact for those interested in the whole Learning Styles thing.

There was a time when I admit that I subscribed to the concept of Learning Styles. I also understand why there’s an instinctive sense-making and buy-in when people look at it. Whether you subscribe to Kolb (1984) or to the VAK theory, we generally accept that people tend to learn in different ways.

Yes.

But… Read the rest of this entry

An Inspiring Podcast from an Unusual Source

Image

Visit 99percentinvisible.org for more information.

I’m distracting myself from a little “student remorse” from my hack job on (Stanford MOOC) DNLE Assignment 4 by sharing a recent find.

While I’m a latecomer to the whole podcast thing, I am making up for lost time and I try to balance out my entertainment (e.g. serialized podcast dramas) with some educational listenings.

This morning I listened to the initial episodes of “99% Invisible“, a podcast out of San Francisco that describes itself as:

A tiny radio show about design, architecture & the 99% invisible activity that shapes our world

I like the concept for a couple of reasons. First, it speaks about design; a fundamental discipline that transcends physical and virtual boundaries. After all, you can have great ideas, but without a solid design to make them happen, they will remain ideas only.

Second, the format. This podcast is a positioned as a radio segment with a very limited time allotment. Therefore, the host and producer have a small window in which to get across their idea or subject.

Finally, it also speaks about the things we don’t normally pay attention to and the thinking behind them.

This podcast has relevance to what we do as educators. First, we have to be aware of the little things, and all of the prep work that goes into a learning solution (e.g. good analysis). Second, solutions don’t have to be big to be effective and meaningful. Finally, design, design, design. Design it, refine it, try it out, refine some more, and let the design evolve. Just because you start with one particular vision doesn’t mean it can’t adapt as you learn more about what recipients “need” instead of what you think they “want”.

Enjoy your Monday!

Storify – My Test Drive

While I grabbed a Storify account some time back, I hadn’t really done much more than explore it at a fairly basic level. However, I finally took the plunge and decided to take a new approach to summarizing one of my favourite PLN discussions, #chat2lrn.

In concept, the Storify concept is simple: search for whatever you want, and turn it into a “story” of related events, news items, media clips, whatever.   Add in your own commentary, reassemble at will, and you can create your very own amalgamated/aggregated digital artifact.

This was a good learning experience for me because I wanted to find a way to catch up on the tweets and draw some of my own conclusions, particularly because I wasn’t able to stay for the whole chat. Read the rest of this entry

My first (deliberate) Sketchnotes – from “Gamification in Education”

Sketchnoting Thoughts

Following my re-blog of Jackie Gerstein’s compilation of Visual Note Taking resources, I took some time today to do a little in-depth exploration of some of the concepts and thought-leaders in that area. Having previously seen Sunni Brown’s TEDTalk on the power of Doodling, I’m enjoying a growing fascination with these ideas.

I’m like many people who wound up taking text notes on lined paper, and years of tacit compliance with the social norms in formal education are proving difficult to re-work.  A number of the people engaged in this process note that this may well be the hardest thing for many to overcome.  One thing that does (should? might? possibly?) work to my advantage is my diploma in Graphic Design. Couple that with a love of drawing and sketching, and I might have the foundation for a (personal) informational revolution. Read the rest of this entry